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Melissa Joulwan’s Paleo Mayonnaise

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Mayo

A zingy Paleo mayo that comes together in minutes.

The technique you use to make this popular mayo recipe varies depending on whether you’re using a regular blender or an immersion blender. Experiment with the amount of salt and dry mustard suits your palate.


Makes two to four servings
Prep time: 5 to 10 minutes, plus time to bring the egg and lemon juice to room temperature

Ingredients

  • 1 large egg
  • 2 tbs. lemon juice
  • 1/2 teaspoon mustard powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 cup plus 1 cup light-tasting olive oil (not extra virgin) or avocado oil

Directions

In a regular blender or food processor:

  • Place the egg and lemon juice in a blender or food processor and allow them come to room temperature together, about 30 minutes. Add the mustard powder, salt, and 1/4 cup of the oil. Blend on low for 20 to 30 seconds.
  • With the blender on low, very slowly drizzle the remaining 1 cup of oil into the mixture. Pour the oil in the thinnest drizzle you can manage and still have movement in the oil; this should take about three minutes. Do not lose your nerve and dump the remaining oil!
  • Use a spatula to transfer to a jar or other container and refrigerate. Your mayo will keep for two weeks in the refrigerator.

Using an immersion blender:

  • Place the egg and lemon juice in a wide-mouth Mason jar and allow them to come to room temperature together, about 30 minutes.
  • Add the mustard powder, salt, and all of the oil. Blend on low for 30 to 60 seconds.
  • Your mayo will keep for two weeks in the refrigerator.

Reprinted with permission from Well Fed Weeknights: Complete Paleo Meals in 45 Minutes or Less by Melissa Joulwan, photography by David Humphreys, published on November 1, 2016, by Greenleaf Book Group Press. Copyright © 2016 by Melissa Joulwan.

Why No Numbers? Readers sometimes ask us why we don’t publish nutrition information with our recipes. We believe that (barring specific medical advice to the contrary) if you’re eating primarily whole, healthy foods — an array of sustainably raised vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds, legumes, meats, fish, eggs, whole-kernel grains, and healthy fats and oils — you probably don’t need to stress about the numbers. We prefer to focus on food quality and trust our bodies to tell us what we need.  — The Editors

Photography by David Humphreys

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