- recipe -

Garlic-Scape Omelet

Garlic scapes are the tender shoots of the garlic plant that grow up and out of the stem, curling their way toward the sky. Most commercial growers remove the scapes to preserve the energy of the garlic bulbs and increase yield. For home cooks, though, they’re a real treat. Look for scapes at farmers’ markets in early summer. You can chop and prepare them like green beans or slice them thinly and sauté to bring out their delicate aroma. Scapes have a far milder taste than mature garlic.

Garlic Scape Omelet

Makes one serving
Prep time: five minutes
Cook time: 10 minutes

  • 2 tbs. butter
  • 1 clove garlic, smashed
  • 2 garlic scapes, thinly sliced on the diagonal
  • 3 eggs
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Heat 1 tablespoon of the butter in a small skillet over medium heat. Add the garlic clove, scapes, salt, and pepper and cook until the scapes begin to soften, about two minutes. Remove the garlic clove and discard; transfer the scapes to a bowl.

Wipe the skillet clean, and then melt the remaining tablespoon of butter in the skillet over medium heat.

Beat the eggs well in a small bowl, and add salt and pepper. Pour the eggs into the pan and stir vigorously to create small, fine curds. As you work, scrape down the sides of the pan so the eggs cook evenly.

Sprinkle one-third of the cooked scapes onto the eggs just before the eggs firm up. When the top is evenly set and not runny, tilt the pan away from you and fold the omelet in half with a spatula. The lip of the pan will help form the shape of the omelet as it continues to cook gently.

Turn out the omelet onto a plate and serve topped with the remaining garlic scapes.

V Is for Vegetables recipes courtesy of Little, Brown and Company. Copyright © 2015 by Michael Anthony and Dorothy Kalins Ink, LLC.

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