- Clean Eating -

The Dirty Dozen Gets Updated

Check out the Environmental Working Group’s latest Dirty Dozen and Clean 15 produce lists.

garlic and onions

This month, the Environmental Working Group (EWG) released the 2011 updated version of the Dirty Dozen and Clean Fifteen lists, based on information collected from the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Food and Drug Administration. The most notable changes: Cherries fell off the Dirty Dozen list and lettuce was introduced onto it.

Although the EWG states that eating non-organic produce is still better than eating none at all, a post from one of our featured partners, MightyNest, discusses some of the risks of being exposed to pesticides:

It is of concern that a fairly recent study has linked children who are exposed to higher levels of pesticides known as organophosphates to having a higher risk of being diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). “The pesticides act on a set of brain chemicals closely related to those involved in ADHD”, explains lead researcher Maryse Bouchard. “Organophosphates were originally developed for chemical warfare, and they are known to be toxic to the nervous system”, adds fellow researcher Marc Weisskopf, of the Harvard School of Public Health, who also worked on the study. Read the full post …

According to the EWG recommendations, you should buy organic for the following produce:

Dirty Dozen
apples
celery
strawberries
peaches
spinach
nectarines – imported
grapes – imported
sweet bell peppers
potatoes
blueberries – domestic
lettuce
kale/collard greens

The following produce contain the least amount of pesticides:

Clean Fifteen
onions
sweet corn
pineapple
avocados
asparagus
sweet peas
mangoes
eggplant
cantaloupe – domestic
kiwi
cabbage
watermelon
sweet potatoes
grapefruit
mushrooms

Here’s the full list of 53 fruits and vegetables tested.

 


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