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Fitness 2.0: A Look at the Apple Watch

Apple enters the world of wearable technology by creating a standalone device that incorporates custom health and fitness apps with the fun and utility of your smartphone.

Apple announces the Apple Watch

More people than ever are tracking their activity levels and workouts with wearable fitness devices and apps, which offer real-time feedback and empower users to make more informed decisions about their health and fitness. In fact, 70 percent of people use mobile apps to track their calorie intake and monitor physical activities on a daily basis, according to a study released this year by Mobiquity, Inc.

So it came as no surprise last week when Apple announced “the next chapter in the Apple story” with the Apple Watch, calling it “its most personal device ever.” According to the press release, the device will enable users to communicate right from their wrists (sending and receiving messages, answering calls to their iPhones, etc.,) and to utilize custom health and fitness apps aimed at helping you lead a healthier life.

The “Activity” app tracks your movement throughout the day, much like a Fitbit, Jawbone, or the Nike+ FuelBand, while “Workout” focuses on delivering real-time stats for your dedicated activities, like your 30-minute run or weight-training session. Plus, the iPhone “Health” app will let you to sync your stats with apps you’re already using (RunKeeper, Nike+ Running, etc.).

And unlike other trackers, Apple Watch incorporates the features of your smartphone with your wearable tracker: your music, a suite of applications, and sensory mechanisms that track your workouts, monitor heart rate — and prompt you to stand up after sitting for too long (something we know is a major health issue for the desk-bound).

Apple CEO Tim Cook believes the Apple Watch “will redefine what people expect from its category,” especially as more people become proactive about their health and begin paying closer attention to the specifics of their activities. Apple Watch offers new ways to deepen this understanding, as well as increase accountability — one of the most powerful incentives for behavior change (see more on that in “Fitness 2.0: Wearable Technology Can Help Improve Your Health“). From sharing your heart rate to the details of your latest workout, sharing and connecting are as easy as a tap on the screen or swivel of the digital crown.

  • Price: Starts at $349
  • Release date: Early 2015

TELL US: Are you excited about the Apple Watch? Is it something you’ll consider as a future fitness device?

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